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HR, Payroll, and Employee Management Tips for Small Business Posts

Can You Work Through Lunch in California Legally?

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California meal period laws can be confusing to many, especially when they are changing every year. Employees used to take meal breaks after 6 hours, but that has since changed to 5 hours after Labor Code Section 512 passed. In addition to Labor Code Section 512, California cities also have their own regulations. With multiple laws in place, it’s incredibly important that employers speak with their local labor boards. This will help ensure that employees are following meal break laws correctly. If employers don’t comply with laws, they may receive penalties and might have to pay employees back in the future.

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Does the Redesigned 2020 Form W-4 Affect Employees and Employers?

2020 W-4 Form

There have been a lot of changes in 2020 in regards to the US overtime policy salary history bans in Ohio, New York, and New Jersey, and the federal mileage rate. In addition to that, the IRS recently changed Form W-4 for employees and employers starting in 2020. This change leaves employees and employers wondering what they need to do moving forward. Luckily, most people don’t have to worry about changes; however, if you’re thinking about getting a new job or hiring new employees in 2020, you’ll want to acquaint yourself with the new Form W-4. 

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7 Tips for an Easier Tax Season

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Contribution by: Guest Author

With the tax return deadline steadily approaching, you might find yourself feeling overwhelmed at the idea of sitting down to do your taxes. You might be concerned about missing documents or worried about owing additional taxes, but by putting it off, you are only creating a bigger problem. To help prevent some of this tax season stress, follow these seven simple tips to make filing your taxes easier than ever.

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Important Employer Tax Filing Dates 2020

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Taxes are difficult for a lot of people, and it’s even tougher when you own a company. Not only do business owners have to track expenses for taxes and other tax deductions, but they must also fill out multiple forms throughout the year for tax filing purposes. With many forms and deadlines, it is difficult to remember when certain IRS forms are due. We don’t want you to stress, so we’ve mapped out all of the important dates so that you know exactly what to do and when to do it. 

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New Mileage Rate for 2020

If you’re an employee or employer, you’re probably aware that a lot of things change in the beginning of each year. This year, for instance, we’ve already seen changes to the US overtime policy new salary history bans in Ohio, New York, and New Jersey, and changes to Form W-4. Of course, to keep us on our toes, the IRS has placed a new regulation upon us. On December 31st, 2019, the IRS released the new standard mileage rate for the year 2020. Their official notice explains the rules of the optional standard mileage rate within the next year. Taxpayers will use this rate when computing deductible costs when using a vehicle for business, charitable, medical, or moving expense purposes. 

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Your Guide to Tax Deductions for Small Businesses

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If you run a small business, you’re going to want to file your tax deductions accurately. Properly filing tax deductions will give you a larger tax return. Unfortunately some businesses are not keeping accurate track of their records. As a result, there are a lot of tax write offs that people miss. To ensure that you benefit from deductions, you must keep records of all aspects of your business, including expenses. Once you’re organized and have valuable data to back up your claims, you may deduct many business expenses.

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Salary History Bans in Ohio, New York, and New Jersey- Effective 2020

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A common question asked during interviews is, “What is your current salary?” Although this sounds like a harmless question, this can lead employers to legal trouble. Of course, this can only lead to trouble if your state or city enforces salary history ban laws. Many states prohibit employers from asking applicants about their past or present salaries or benefits. The salary ban is said to decrease the salary disparities among different genders. Additionally, salary history bans prevent employers from decreasing salary offers based on the applicant’s past income. As a result of these bans, employees feel as though they are getting a fair shot in earning compensation.

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