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Author: Lindsay Sommers

7 Reasons Why You Should Hire a Payroll Expert

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Payroll is one of the most important aspects of business– it builds financial stability among employees and boosts team morale. Many businesses, especially small businesses, tend to take payroll into their own hands and avoid outsourcing payroll. Managers and business owners spend hours calculating everything themselves, often times juggling other roles in the business at the same time. Taking care of your own payroll works when your business is just starting out, but this should be avoided when the business grows.

Once business is booming, it’s wise to bring in a payroll expert to make sure that you save yourself time, headaches, and money. This will allow you to focus on the growth of the business rather than worrying about whether or not your employees are going to get paid on time. Additionally, without a payroll expert, there’s a chance that you can make a mistake. Mistakes can lead your business to legal penalties, so getting some help might not be a bad idea.

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Improving Your Remote Workforce’s Team Culture

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Commuting to work is a thing of the past. More and more business owners are getting into the remote workforce trend. In fact, it has gained so much popularity that it has risen by approximately 115% in the last decade. Having a remote workforce is great because of its flexibility, but you may run into new issues that you would otherwise not have in an office. You may start asking yourself questions such as “How will I know what my employees are up to?” and “How will I ensure that my workforce still works like a team?” While there are systems to make sure that employees are staying productive, creating traditional workplace bonds between your remote team members will take a little more effort and creativity. 

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How to Report a Deceased Employee’s Wages

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Losing an employee is a confusing and painful time for many people. When a colleague passes away, employers not only grieve the loss of their team member, but they also have to figure out how to move the business forward. Although it feels like it’s not the best time, the business does have to take steps to ensure that the job position is filled again and that the necessary paperwork is taken care of. One of the first things that needs to be handled is the employee’s final wages. What does one do with their final paycheck? What happens to time off? And what taxes should be filed? 

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Overtime Rules Are Changing January 1st, 2020. Are You Ready?

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If you are a non exempt employee or you have non exempt employees in the US, times are about to change! Since 2004, overtime threshold rules have stayed the same. This means that the cost of living threshold increased and the requirements for overtime did as well. The Obama administration took up the issue and directed changes to overtime laws that would have expanded the number of eligible workers. However, the Trump Administration prevented those changes. Nearly 3 years later, the rules are finally slated to change, but severely watered down from the previous plan.

On Sept. 24th, 2019 the US Department of Labor (DOL) announced their final overtime rules that will affect many Americans. In fact, the new overtime rule will make overtime pay available to over 1.3 million workers and will provide an estimated $298.8 million in additional pay. The new overtime rules will become effective officially on Jan 1st, 2020. Here’s what you need to know:

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Federal Tax Deductions For Businesses Who Donate to Charity

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Businesses everywhere donate to charitable organizations every year. After all, it’s a great way to contribute to society and it’s probably tax deductible. Timesheets.com, for instance, donates to organizations like the Jane Goodall Institute, The African Wildlife Foundation, The Humane Society of the United States, and others. Did your business donate to a charitable organization this year? If so, you may be able to claim a deduction if you donated to a qualifying  501(c) 3 organization. The IRS states that you can deduct contributions given to any religious, charitable, educational, scientific, or literary organization. If you donated to any of the organizations listed above, you may be eligible for deductions. Here’s your guide to understand your contributions and tax deductions:

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Is it Legal to Automatically Deduct Employee Lunch Time?

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Lunchtime can be a tricky thing to track. Some employees forget to clock out, adding minutes to their paychecks daily, while others forget to clock back into work once they return. This leads to inaccurate timestamps and, even worse, inaccurate payroll. You will end up either overpaying employees or underpaying employees, which can lead to issues down the line. In order to keep timestamps more accurate, some employers choose to implement automatic lunch deductions for hourly employees. This ensures that employees get lunch breaks deducted, no matter the circumstance. This is great for employers who want to avoid overpaying employees, but many people still have questions about the legality of lunch deductions. 

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Is it Legal to Track Employees Using GPS?

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Managing employees has never been easier with the introduction of online time tracking. Managers no longer have to wonder where employees are or what they are doing– all information is available in real-time. Tracking location using GPS is one of the most significant features of employee tracking that employers take advantage of. This data can tell an employer exactly where an employee is working and when they are working. For instance, an employers can determine if an employee clocked in at the office, from the local Starbucks, or even from home. Employers also use GPS tracking to capture miles driven in company-owned or personal vehicles. The data collected is easy to obtain and gives employers transparency, but is it legal? 

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