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Category: Business Math

Business Math: Calculating the Regular Rate for Overtime

 

Many businesses have employees that get paid multiple pay rates during their shift. This happens when they perform more than one specific job function. For those employees, the hourly rate depends on the job they are working on at the time. Hourly rates by job can vary when employees work in the construction, plumbing, caretaking, landscaping, and many other industries. When you have an employee that works under different rates, you need to make sure that you are calculating their regular pay rate properly for overtime. Unless your employee is specifically exempted, employees working at more than one job rate covered by the FLSA must receive overtime pay at their regular rate and not at the specific rate for the job they are doing when overtime is incurred.

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Business Math: Calculating Mileage When Using a Personal Vehicle

Calculating mileage reimbursement starts by knowing when you actually need to reimburse your employees. Although many employers think that they have to pay for mileage , the federal Government does not require you to reimburse employees. However, there are certain states that have regulations. California, for instance, requires employers to reimburse employees for any losses incurred while completing work duties

The IRS sets the mileage reimbursement rate for employees who drive their own Privately Owned Vehicles (POV), but this rate is a guideline for employers and a tax deduction opportunity for employees. You can choose whether or not you want to pay your employees more or less than the IRS rate. Also, keep in mind that you have to follow your state’s reimbursement regulations as well. In Addition to that, under FLSA regulation, you must pay your employees the standard minimum wage. If their expenses lead them to an hourly rate below minimum wage, you will have to assist them with the cost.

The IRS has a guideline for reimbursable and non reimbursable expenses when an employee uses their own POV for business duties. Here are some reimbursable and non reimbursable expenses:

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Business Math: Calculate Discounts & Sale Price

Sale: Percent off price

Calculating the sale price of an item is one of the few math problems that most people will actually use after high school. Nevertheless, many of us don’t know how to do it. Not knowing what the price will be at checkout is frustrating. And not knowing how to help customers is even more frustrating. Thankfully, there are some tricks to make it easier.

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Business Math Series: Markup

Markup is the percent of increase in selling price from the original cost. Companies mark up products they sell in order to make money for their business. How much they mark up the products depends on many factors, including demand, whether the product is a luxury item, and so forth. Some items are marked up considerably. It’s hard to believe we pay what we do for common items.

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Business Math: How to Count Change Back to a Customer

count changeWhen a clerk grabs the change due from the cash register and plops it in your hand, you would have to do some pretty quick math to know you got the right change.

But when a clerk counts up from the total and stops at the amount tendered, it is a relief for you and a guarantee for her that the amount is correct. Not everyone is a natural with numbers so I’ll outline the steps to make it easy.

 

 

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