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Tag: business math

Business Math: How and When to Calculate PTO Payouts

A paid time off (PTO) payout is compensation for earned time off that an employer must pay employees when they leave their jobs. Although the FLSA doesn’t require business owners to give their employees time off, some employers who give time off benefits to their employees must pay out their employees when they leave the company under law. Why is that? Some states require employers to handle an employee’s accrued vacation hours in a certain way. According to state law, former employers must give their employees the cash value of their accrued time off balances upon leaving.

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Business Math: When to Use Flat Rate Pay Raises

Every so often it’s time to give your employees raises. When and how you give those raises is entirely dependent on you. You have the choice to give raises by a percentage or flat rate. Most businesses calculate raises by percentage and we have a great article on that topic here. In this article, we’ll be focusing on the flat rate raise.

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Business Math: Calculating the Regular Rate for Overtime

Many businesses have employees that get paid multiple pay rates during their shift. This happens when they perform more than one specific job function. For those employees, the hourly rate depends on the job they are working on at the time. Hourly rates by job can vary when employees work in the construction, plumbing, caretaking, landscaping, and many other industries. When you have an employee that works under different rates, you need to make sure that you are calculating their regular pay rate properly for overtime. Unless your employee is specifically exempted, employees working at more than one job rate covered by the FLSA must receive overtime pay at their regular rate and not at the specific rate for the job they are doing when overtime is incurred.

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Business Math: Calculating Mileage When Using a Personal Vehicle

Calculating mileage reimbursement starts by knowing when you actually need to reimburse your employees. Although many employers think that they have to pay for mileage , the federal Government does not require you to reimburse employees. However, there are certain states that have regulations. California, for instance, requires employers to reimburse employees for any losses incurred while completing work duties

The IRS sets the mileage reimbursement rate for employees who drive their own Privately Owned Vehicles (POV), but this rate is a guideline for employers and a tax deduction opportunity for employees. You can choose whether or not you want to pay your employees more or less than the IRS rate. Also, keep in mind that you have to follow your state’s reimbursement regulations as well. In Addition to that, under FLSA regulation, you must pay your employees the standard minimum wage. If their expenses lead them to an hourly rate below minimum wage, you will have to assist them with the cost.

The IRS has a guideline for reimbursable and non reimbursable expenses when an employee uses their own POV for business duties. Here are some reimbursable and non reimbursable expenses:

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