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Tag: minimum wage

Which States Raised Minimum Wage in 2021?

A man holding a minimum wage sign, climbing up stairs.

Over the years, employees in the United States have fought to increase the federal minimum wage to $15/hr with many political leaders joining in the effort. The federal minimum wage has remained at $7.25/hr since 2009 and studies show that roughly two-thirds of Americans support an increase. With the new makeup of the Senate this year, this long-overdue increase is looking more likely than ever. In the meantime, many individual states have continued to increase their minimum wages in order to keep up with the cost of living in their regions.

Did your state increase its minimum wage? Let’s find out!

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Is it legal to Cut an Employee’s Pay and Hours Because of COVID-19?

Empty piggy bank

Throughout the past few weeks the coronavirus has left the world empty and desolate. With lockdown measures and social distancing orders in place, people refrain from going to restaurants, communicating in-person, and going to work. As the nation adjusts to this austere new lifestyle, consumerism has slowed down immensely. Consumers are only buying the essentials, which means they aren’t spending like they used to. Of course, when people aren’t spending money, businesses don’t make money. Therefore, many business owners have had to make tough decisions to stay afloat.

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Changes to California Minimum Wage Law Effective July 1st, 2019

California state with California bear

As an employer, it’s incredibly important to ensure that you are paying your employees at least minimum wage. The federal law sets the base wage for all workers in the United States, but minimum wage can change on a city and state level. California, for instance, varies minimum wage all across the state. California Lawmakers changed the minimum wage for many counties and cities on January 1st of this year, but there was another increase effective July 1st, 2019. This change affects large employers (26 or more employees) and small employers (25 employees or fewer). Below you will see a summary of counties and cities making changes to minimum wage. We encourage you to speak with your local labor board to ensure that you are familiar with your city’s changes

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2018 State Minimum Wage Changes

State minimum wage increase table

Note: These rates should be used for general informational purposes only and are not intended to be used for legal or professional purposes. Please visit state websites before making changes to employees’ rates.

There are a lot of minimum wage changes this year in the nation’s states. The rates are to take effect on January 1st, 2018 but some, like New York, may take effect December 31st, 2017.

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As Cities Fight For Wage Increases, States Ban Local Efforts

St Louis Capitol Building and Arch

On August 28th, 2017, many minimum wage workers that saw a wage increase back in May will see that increase revoked. The state government of Missouri passed a law barring municipalities from raising the minimum wage above the state’s rate.

When the state’s rate goes into effect, employers are at liberty to reverse the increases employees got in St. Louis due to the local law. The city’s new minimum wage will revert to $7.70 per hour. That’s a $2.30, or 23%, pay cut for employees.

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California’s Minimum Wage Hike

Fight for 15

Several cities have significantly raised the minimum wage in recent years around the $15 per hour range but California is the first state in the nation to do it. On Monday, Governor Jerry Brown and California state legislators reached a deal to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2022. The deal raises the minimum wage from the current $10 per hour by 50 cents per year for 2 years, and then by one dollar for four years.

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Business Math: Paying Employees a Living Wage

Business man breaking open piggy bank savingsWith all the talk about raising the Federal minimum wage to $10.10 per hour, business owners are thinking about living wages and how to ensure that they are paying their employees enough money to satisfy their basic needs.

Coming up with a blanket “living wage” might be a good start for helping lift millions of Americans out of poverty, but I think it’s worth noting that a living wage is personal and will vary from person to person.

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