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Tag: Privacy

Can Your Employer Require You to Turn on Your Camera During Meetings?

The workforce has changed tremendously since the start of the pandemic in 2020. According to studies, approximately 41.8% of the American workforce worked remotely during the start of the pandemic, but that has since fallen to about 22%. Still, millions of people still work from their home offices, kitchens, or living rooms. Since this transition, many employers have tried to keep positive company culture alive. To achieve this, employers started asking employees to turn on their cameras during meetings. However, this raised employees’ concerns about privacy. Some argue that they must share their homes and personal lives with others when the camera is on. They say that this is not only an issue of privacy but that this requirement should be illegal. Well, is it?

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Can Your Boss Read Your Slack Messages?

Slack is a popular communication platform used by many remote workers. It’s a great platform to communicate and collaborate through instant messaging and video conferencing, which many remote teams enjoy as a new mode of communication. With the choice of public “channels” and private messaging, people have the freedom to speak publicly or work one-on-one with their coworkers easily. Some argue that Slack is more of a distraction than a tool conducive to one’s productivity due to the fact that people may use it to idly chat all day; however, many employers still utilize this system to collaborate with their workers.

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Is it Legal to Track Employees Using GPS?

Managing employees has never been easier with the introduction of online time tracking. Managers no longer have to wonder where employees are or what they are doing– all information is available in real-time. Tracking location using GPS is one of the most significant features of employee tracking that employers take advantage of. This data can tell an employer exactly where an employee is working and when they are working. For instance, an employer can determine if an employee clocked in at the office, from the local Starbucks, or even from home. Employers also use GPS tracking to capture miles driven in company-owned or personal vehicles. The data collected is easy to obtain and gives employers transparency, but is it legal? 

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